Your questions about albino corn snake

Chris asks…

What happens when you breed an albino corn snake and a snow corn snake?

I have a young albino corn snake and I’m about to get a snow corn snake that is a male and I am going to want to breed them.

Chris answers:

All of the offspring would be albinos het for snow. Snow is caused by albinism, which is lack of black pigment, and anerythrism (type A), which is lack red pigment. This leaves a snake which is mostly white with yellow pigment. Since the snow carries the albino gene, all offspring will be albino since the other parent is an albino. Also, all of the offspring will inherit the anery gene from the snow parent, which makes them het for snow since snow is albino and anery combined.

Disregard the first answer, as you don’t need to know the genetics of the parents since yours already display the genetics.

Ken asks…

I have a baby albino Corn snake that is not eating can someone help?

I have a young albino corn snake that I have had for a month. The first time I fed her was three days after I got her and she ate the pinkey then. I tried feeding her about a week later and she wouldn’t eat then though. Can someone please help me!

Chris answers:

Some snakes only eat once every couple of months. I would say try twice a week until she takes it…if she doesn’t take it soon check with the pet store where you got her or google it.

Sandy asks…

Why does my albino corn snake have multiple black spots on his underbelly?

I was holding slither( albino corn snake) and i looked on his underbelly and saw multiple black spots on his underbelly and i don’t know what they are. Please answer.

Chris answers:

Are they under his scales? Could be mites. Quite a pain to get rid of.

Mary asks…

What will I get if I cross a black albino motley and an orange albino corn snake?

I have a male black albino motley, 66% heterozygous, dilute, amel, caremel corn snake. Not sure of geneology on the female. Just know that she’s an orange albino. I’m just wondering in case maybe I want to breed them. Thanks.

Chris answers:

There is no such thing as a black albino. Albino means it lacks all black pigment, so this is not possible. Perhaps you mean anery, or anerythristic, which means it lacks red pigment, which normally corn snakes have. Anerys are also called black corns. Breeding an anery to an albino will create nothing but normals which are het for both traits, capable of producing snows. Unless of course your snakes happen to be het for the same traits, then you will get other morphs.

James asks…

ok i have an albino corn snake,how long does it usually take for it to eat or before it will start eating?

ok i just bought an albino corn snake about a week ago, and its still young and we havent fed it because when we got it it was already fed, how long will it take before the snake decides to eat the pinky? and will it not eat it if the pinky is to big? there really arnt any informational sites on this subject, and im feeding it thawed pinkys. so if any one knows let me know.

Chris answers:

If you haven’t found any info it’s because you’re not looking. www.cornsnakes.com has a load of FAQ’s including feeding problems etc. Babies are usually shy and if you got this one from a petstore, there’s a good chance it’s never eaten…unless you saw them feed it. In any case, make sure there are plenty of hides for it to feel secure. Offer food once a week. Make sure the pinky is of appropriate size and very hot. If you’re feeding in the viv, make sure there is no substrate in there. Try placing the snake and the pinky in a small container (with holes for air of course) and put the container in the viv overnight without disturbing the snake (you don’t need to worry about substrate if you do this). Refrain from holding the snake until it’s eaten. It could be too nervous. It might be getting near to shedding and many snakes will not eat before that time..often for 2 weeks before. They can go a long time without eating so I would not worry too much.

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